A message from

The way you handle your mistakes can make or brake how people perceive you.

After the recent hail storm here in Michigan, my wife and I suspected we might have hail damage to our roof.  We were unsuccessful in getting any contractors to come out and take a look.  We gave up and resolved to just let it go.  One day, my wife was at home and someone knocked at the door.  It was a roofing contractor; he was doing another roof in the area and he wanted to go up and check out our roof.  My wife gave him the thumbs up.  When he came down he told her we had significant damage and he felt confident it would be replaced by our insurance company.  As he was taking down his ladder he smashed a piece off our light pole in the front yard.  He handed the broken piece to my wife and drove away.  We had the adjuster come look at the roof and indeed, we were told to find a contractor to replace the roof…it would be covered.

Now, we had to decide who to use.  I felt indebted to the contractor who voluntarily found the issue, but he also broke my light pole.  I went to Home Depot that weekend and replaced the part for $10.  If the contractor would have replaced the $10 piece he could have locked in thousands of dollars for himself.  Because he chose to ignore the mistake, I had very limited confidence in how he would handle my roof.  If he couldn’t acknowledge his error and try to prove he cared, I did not want him working on my home.

Do you admit when your wrong? Do you say, “I’m sorry,” even if you feel it’s not all your fault? Do you see your mistakes as ways to prove how much you care?  When you make a mistake at home, it’s an opportunity to show your family how much you love and respect them.  When you make a mistake with you customer, it is the same…show them how much you love, care, and respect them.  Sometimes, the way you handle your mistakes tells more about you then the way you handle successes. I am a returning customer to businesses that have made mistakes.  The way they handled those mistakes contributes to my loyalty.

You are going to make mistakes, but you decide if they produce ordinary or extraordinary.

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